"5 sci-fi or fantasy books that non-sci-fi or fantasy fans will enjoy," over the covers of those books.

Five Science Fiction/Fantasy Books for Non-Science Fiction/Fantasy Fans to Enjoy

Since I founded a blog that focuses on science fiction/fantasy books, you might think I’m biased towards them. From that, you might conclude that I don’t understand non-science fiction/fantasy fans (let’s call them NSFFFs). You might even think that I couldn’t–or even shouldn’t–recommend books to them. I have, however, been a member of multiple NSFFF book clubs, and reviewed a long list of NSFF books. I unite with book fans everywhere who love good writing and want to support the unique medium of books. In that spirit, might I recommend five books that even the staunchest NSFFF will like, for those universal reasons.

The Giver, by Lois Lowry

an old man staring into the distance, with a Newbery medal under the titleThe Giver is the kind of book you read when you need something quick but thought-provoking. It’s the original dystopian novel, the book that came way before The Hunger Games and Matched.  Because it’s told from a twelve-year-old’s perspective, it’s refreshing while still illuminating the darker corners of human nature. It’s now available on ThriftBooks.com for $3.79.

 

Shades of Milk and Honey, by Mary Robinette Kowal

A woman in a regency ball gown cloaked with lights, behind the words "Shades of Milk and Honey"This is a beautiful historical fantasy romance, kind of like Jane Austen or Josi Kilpack meets Harry Potter. And you can get it on BetterWorldBooks.com for $3.98 with free shipping.

 

 

The Cost of All Things, by Maggie Lehrman

Four people walking along a beach, silhouetted by a setting sun, under the words "the cost of all things"Goodreads says it’s “Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind meets We Were Liars.”  It’s  $3.95 in BetterWorldBooks.com with free shipping.

 

 

Frankenstein, by Mary Shelley

Frankenstein: The painting of a naked man, twisted so that only his back, right knee, and anguished face show.Most of my NSFFF friends who read contemporary or historical say they do so to immerse themselves in the here-and-now or the past, to learn, to understand people better. In that sense, Frankenstein is an excellent read, one that provokes plenty of ruminations on human nature. And it’s free on Kindle.

A Thousand Pieces of You, by Claudia Gray

A black-and-white city skyline, then a different city skyline upside down beneath it, in front of a swath of color. On top of it all, the words: "A Thousand Pieces of You"Romance, lest you think that all science fiction/fantasy books are without it. Good romance, and, as I said here, a compelling, fast-paced plot. Like The Cost of All Things, it’s $3.95 on BetterWorldBooks.com with free shipping.

 

 

 

 

A woman's face, with part of it blurred, staring. Over her lips is the word "Whisper"

Book Review: Whisper is a Crisp Read for $3.99

Have you ever heard a book described as “crisp?” For some reason, that’s the adjective that first comes to mind when I think of Whisper by Lynette Noni. It’s suspenseful and a little bit scary, not fast-paced enough to be called “brisk,” but nail-biting and tense, with a narrative style that moves you quickly through the story. I recommend it for fans of suspense, fantasy, and science fiction books, as it has elements that will definitely satisfy all of those groups.

What Is Whisper About?

From Goodreads:

“Lengard is a secret government facility for extraordinary people,” they told me.

I believed them. That was my mistake.

There isn’t anyone else in the world like me.

I’m different…an anomaly…a monster.

For two years, six months, fourteen days, eleven hours and sixteen minutes, Subject Six-Eight-Four — ‘Jane Doe’ — has been locked away and experimented on, without uttering a single word.

As Jane’s resolve begins to crack under the influence of her new — and unexpectedly kind — evaluator, she uncovers the truth about Lengard’s mysterious ‘program’, discovering that her own secret is at the heart of a sinister plot … and one wrong move, one wrong word, could change the world.

What’s The Deal?

You can get it on Kindle for $3.99. Very much worth it.

Who Would Like Whisper?

As mentioned, anyone who likes suspense or sci-fi. It reminded me strongly of Shatter Me, by Tahereh Mafi, since it starts off almost exactly the same way.

Nutrition Facts, Anyone?

Profanity (sh*, d*, f*, g*d*): 7

Sex: none

Violence: some

positive themes (helping others, familial love, etc.): 2-3

negative themes (vindictiveness, revenge, selfishness): 4-5

The white words: "There are no whitewashed walls here, no silence of forgotten dreams, no nightmares of unending futures. Instead, here there is life."

 

 

A Book That Is More Than It Seems: More Than This by Patrick Ness

More Than This, by Patrick Ness, is an interesting book. Indeed, by its title, you would think that there was more to the book than what it appears to be about. Or you might think that the main character would be seeking something more than the life he or she has been given. You might even think that the theme—the underlying story, if you will—is that we all need to recognize that there’s more to this life than what we think there is. If you read this book and thought any one of those things, you would be right…in a way. It’s a book that some would say is slow-moving and simplistic, the story of a teenage boy who wakes up in a place he’s not supposed to be who strives to make sense of his environment.  But you don’t have to think about it much to realize that its message is more than that, a deep message about life.

What Is More Than This About?

From Amazon:

Seth drowns, desperate and alone. But then he wakes. Naked, thirsty, starving. But alive. And where is he? The street seems familiar, but everything is abandoned, overgrown, covered in dust. He remembers dying, his skull bashed against the rocks. Has he woken up in his own personal hell? Is there more to this life, or perhaps this afterlife?

Who Would Like More Than This, And Why?

Anyone who likes good writing, the kind that sweeps you along like a gust of summer wind, the kind found in books like The Giver by Lois Lowry or If I Stay by Gayle Forman, will like More Than This.  If you’ve read The Knife of Never Letting Go, also by Patrick Ness, you’ll probably like More Than This too, although it’s a different kind of book. Know that there are sci-fi-ish elements like those in Ready Player One by Earnest Cline, and dystopian elements like in Nemesis by Brendan Reichs. I can’t tell you what they are because that would give away a good portion of the plot.

What’s The Deal?

You can get a used copy of More Than This through Thriftbooks.com for $4.89.

Nutrition Facts, Anyone?

Serving size: 480 pages (print), 5430 locations (ebook)

Swear words (d*, f*, sh*, g*d*): 70

Incidences of violence (suicide, murder, death): ~15

positive themes (familial effort & love, charity): ~7

negative themes (selfishness, criminality, meanness): 3-5 big ones

gay characters/mentions: 1 (m.c.)

other (mention of masturbation): 1

Visual

via GIPHY

Favorite Quote

 

A mysterious eye, set in a dark-skinned, painted face, over the title "Truth Seer"

Book Review & Deal: Truth Seer – an Adventure Read

How was your 4th of July? What did you do? We went to two family gatherings, one for my side of the family and one for my husband’s, and ate a ton at both. I feel like it was a mini-Thanksgiving. Of course, I spent a little bit of time reading and looking for deals, and I wanted to tell you about a book that just came out that’s only 99¢! It’s Truth Seer by Kay L. Moody, kind of Lara Croft: Tomb Raider with superpowers.

What’s Truth Seer About?

From Amazon:

Egypt, 2121. Imara Kalu knows how she wants her future to go: become a police interrogator in Kenya and then graduate as a truth seer in her last semester of the summer training program. But her plans fall apart when a group of terrorists take over the school and carry out a desperate kidnapping. Devastated that her sister is among the victims, Imara leads a rescue team and descends into the dangerous catacombs where the hostages are rumored to be hidden. Although suspicious of others because of the truth she sees, Imara knows the rescue team will need her help as a truth seer to bypass the lethal illusions laid by the abductors. But as the terrorist traps escalate, Imara realizes how much truth she’s been ignoring and that holding back could get her sister killed. Throughout the journey, Imara confronts her past and amplifies her abilities as a truth seer only to discover that her sister’s kidnapping is just one piece of a much darker secret.

Who Would Like Truth Seer, And Why?

Aside from the Lara Croft movie, like I said, Truth Seer reminded me of two books: Unearthed by Amie Kaufman and Meagan Spooner, which I reviewed here, and The Conspiracy of Us by Maggie Hall, which I’m reading right now. All three are about people trying to work their way through a series of very obtuse clues to discover a mysterious but great boon in some kind of ancient structure or structures. In Unearthed, it’s a temple on an alien planet. In Conspiracy, which is sort of a YA Davinci Code, it’s places like the Cathedral of Notre Dame. In Truth Seer, it’s a catacomb in future Egypt.  Imara, the main character, can see people’s emotions, an ability that she hopes will help her find and rescue her sister from kidnappers but which also affects the dynamics between her and the other people who help her explore the catacombs. This book is adventure, emotion, and intrigue. I had a little bit of a hard time connecting with Imara, but can’t put my finger on why.

What’s The Deal?

If you buy Truth Seer on Amazon, where it was published, in the next 24 hours, you’ll only pay 99¢. After that, the ebook will go up to $4.99 (which is still a good deal) and the print book will be $12.95.  I’ve got a free physical copy to giveaway to a random winner selected by Rafflecopter: a Rafflecopter giveaway

I’ve got an exclusive interview with Kay Moody, the author, coming out tomorrow to all my subscribers. If you haven’t subscribed to be sent newsletters and notification of new posts, you should do so now, on the right sidebar of my main page!

Nutrition Facts?

Profanity (D*, S*, H*, F*): 0

Sex scenes: 0

Good stuff: lots

Visual?

via GIPHY

 

YA sci-fi book cover: black page with "POD" in big blue letters, the blue being a black orb

Book Review: Pod is a Tight Read, With A 20% Off Deal

Whew! My site was down temporarily, and I was stressing out! My apologies. My domain hosting company had somehow put my site on a different server, connected to a different account, but the problem has been fixed. I spent the time scouting for deals, though, because I get excited thinking about bringing them to you and helping you get better entertainment for less! I’ve got some good sales to tell you about tomorrow. In the meantime, let me tell you about POD by Stephen Wallenfels, a YA sci-fi. It was a tight read, one that’ll have you chewing your nails even if you’re not a nail-chewer.

What Is POD About?

From GoodReads:

POD is the story of a global cataclysmic event, told from the viewpoints of Megs, a twelve-year-old streetwise girl trapped in a hotel parking garage in Los Angeles; and sixteen-year-old Josh, who is stuck in a house in Prosser, Washington, with his increasingly obsessive-compulsive father. Food and water and time are running out. Will Megs survive long enough to find her mother? Will Josh and his father survive each other? 

Sample:

Surviving a massive alien siege is one thing-surviving humanity is another. I’m all cried out. I’m still alone. The sky is full of giant spinning black balls that kill anyone stupid enough to go outside. I’ve only been out of the car twice-once to pee and once to look at the sky. That one look was enough for me. Now I sit alone in the car, staring out the window like a rat in a cage. But I don’t have anyone to look at. The parking garage is empty, except for twisted-up cars, broken glass, and the smell of leaking gasoline.

Who Would Like POD, And Why?

If you like tight plots, like those found in Glimmer by Phoebe Katanidis or A Thousand Pieces of You by Claudia Gray, you’ll like POD. Its plot, which could’ve been boring in the wrong hands, since it’s about enduring an alien siege, is terse, interesting, and mentally challenging because of the intense emotions expertly shown. You’ll find yourself wanting a sequel.

What’s The Deal?

On Amazon, you can get a new paperback copy right now for $6.39, which is 20% off of the normal price. A Kindle copy is only $4.99! Dude! So worth it.

 

These Broken Stars cover

Book Reviews and Deals: These Broken Stars and This Shattered World: Tidal Wave Reads

I must start this book review by mentioning another book review site, The Book Smugglers, because it is from that site and its really good, in-depth reviews that I learned about These Broken Stars by Amie Kaufman and Meagan Spooner. The book is sometimes called “Titanic in space” because the crash of a giant spaceship is what sets off its main conflict. The daughter of the richest man in the universe, and a poor, orphaned soldier are the only two survivors on a terra-formed, unpopulated planet, and they both hate each other. But they have to get along in order to survive. This is not the first time that such a conflict forms the centerpiece of a story, but it is the first time that it has been done with such original effect.

What Is These Broken Stars About?

From Goodreads:

Luxury spaceliner Icarus suddenly plummets from hyperspace into the nearest planet. Lilac LaRoux and Tarver Merendsen survive – alone. Lilac is the daughter of the richest man in the universe. Tarver comes from nothing, a cynical war hero. Both journey across the eerie deserted terrain for help. Everything changes when they uncover the truth.  The Starbound Trilogy: Three worlds. Three love stories. One enemy.

These Broken Stars cover

Why I Liked These Broken Stars, And Why You Might Like It Too

I, for one,  loved the uniqueness of the plot and the premise, two young people marooned on a planet struggling to overcome the mindsets that keep them apart. They must search for other survivors and a way to communicate an SOS signal. In that sense, the plot is tied inextricably to their movement along their days-long hike.  The evolution of their dynamic feels very real, especially since the story is told from alternating points of view. Lilac, the daughter, learns how and why she should really rely on herself more. Not only that, her eyes are opened to the dark deeds of her father, who has kept her under his gilded thumb her entire life. And Tarver–his discovery of the fact that there are things worth protecting, not just dying for, but living for and taking care of–it’s a beautiful thing.

Were it just for those things, I would have rated These Broken Stars highly. But then, a twist developed that was wholly unexpected, that brought in more of a fantasy feel, that made it even better. I was, in fact, a very bad person when I read this, because I had to read it all through in one day! I felt like this book was well-paced, walking a perfect line between conflict and emotional development. It can be such a struggle to develop both simultaneously. It was one of those books that pulls you inexorably forward to find out what happens. A joy to read.

What’s the Deal?

You can get These Broken Stars for $3.98 on BetterWorldBooks with free shipping.

Nutrition Facts, Anyone?

Swearing (d*, sh*, f*, h*, g*d*): 56

Sex: none, although there’s some making out

Violence: little bit

Stars: 10 out of 10

Second Book in the Series: This Shattered World

The second book in the series, This Shattered World, did not disappoint either, although it was about completely different characters. Here’s its description:

Jubilee Chase and Flynn Cormac should never have met. Lee is captain of the forces sent to Avon to crush the terraformed planet’s rebellious colonists, but she has her own reasons for hating the rebels. Rebellion is in Flynn’s blood. His sister died in the original uprising against the powerful corporations that terraformed Avon. These corporations make their fortune by terraforming uninhabitable planets across the universe and recruiting colonists to make the planets livable. They promised better [lives]. But they never fulfilled their promise on Avon, and decades later, Flynn is leading the rebellion against them.

Desperate for any advantage in a bloody and unrelentingly war, Flynn does the only thing that makes sense when he and Lee cross paths: he returns to base with her as prisoner. But as his fellow rebels prepare to execute this tough-talking girl with nerves of steel, Flynn makes another choice that will change him forever. He and Lee escape base together, caught between two sides of a senseless war. As Flynn and Lee attempt to uncover the truth about Avon, they realize that there is a conspiracy on the planet that runs deeper than either of them could imagine.

Why I Liked This Shattered World, And Why You Might Too

Everything about the second book is different–the characters, the setting, the conflict–but there is the same vividness of setting, starkness of conflict, and unforgettable characters. I wrote this in my Amazon review:

This was a 10 on my not-able-to-put-down scale! I loved everything about it. The plot had the impetus of a tidal wave. It was built around a conflict that was stark and very tense. Though this book’s setting is on a world very different from our own, I didn’t have a problem visualizing where things were taking place. The characters were marvelously believable and wonderfully drawn. There was exactly the right balance between internal monologue and external action; enough of the former to make the extreme changes the two main characters go through seem not only feasible but necessary, and enough of the latter to continually glue my eyes to the pages. Such a joy to read!

This Shattered World cover

What’s The Deal?

You can get This Shattered World through BetterWorld.com for $3.95.

Nutrition Facts, Anyone?

Swearing (d*, f*, sh*, h*, g*d*): 51

Sex: same as in book 1

Violence: same as in book 1

Have you read the third book in the series, Their Fractured Light? If so, what did you think?